Founded In    1993
Published   semiannually
Language(s)   Chinese
     

Fields of Interest

 

Literatures in English

     
ISSN   1024-2856
     
Affiliated Organization   English and American Literature Association of TAIWAN
     
Publisher   Bookman Books, Ltd.
     
Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief:
Ping-chia Feng.
Professor of Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, National Chiao Tung University

Editorial board:
Eva Yin-i Chen Professor of Department of English, National Chengchi University
Wen-ching Ho Professor of Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, Feng Chia University
I-ping Liang Professor of Department of English, National Taiwan Normal University
Yu-chen Lin Professor of Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Sun Yat-sen University
Ching-hsi Perng Distinguished Professor of English and Drama of National Taiwan University
Tsu-chung Su Professor of Department of English, National Taiwan Normal University

     
Advisory board:
Ying-Hsiung Chou   Emeritus Professor of Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Chiao Tung University
Yu-cheng Lee   Distinguished Research Fellow and Director of Institute of American and European Studies, Academia Sinica
Te-Hsing Shan   Research Fellow and Deputy Director of Institute of American and European Studies, Academia Sinica
Rey Chow               Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities and Professor of Modern Culture & Media Studies, Comparative Literature, and English
William Tay   Chair Professor of Division of Humanities, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Sau-ling Cynthia Wong   Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

 

 

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

A.The journal will not consider for publication manuscripts being simultaneously submitted elsewhere. Any content of thesis or dissertation will be considered as submitted manuscripts.

B.Two or three pundits of the concerned fields will participate in the anonymous refereeing process. Please take the advice of the comments of referees to revise the acknowledged manuscripts. We reserve the rights of revising the acknowledged manuscripts including any translation and the bibliography.

C.The author of the acknowledged manuscript will be presented with five latest issues.

D.It is the Journal’s policy to upload the content of the publication manuscripts to the associated websites of EALA for academic use.

E.Please send the manuscript, an abstract, and a list of keywords separately in Chinese and English as Word-attachments to: ealataiwan@gmail.com

F.Manuscripts should be prepared according to the latest edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, or please refer to the following concise principles:
a.The title of any book, journal, film, or painting in Chinese should be quoted with 《》. Titles in western languages should be italicized. For example: 《在理論的年代》by Lee Yu-cheng, 《歐洲雜誌》、the French children film 《大雨大雨一直下》, 《葛爾尼卡》by Picasso, Matrix, and Portnoy’s Complaint.
b.The Chinese title of a single thesis or brief work should be quoted with <> and with ” ” if it is in western languages. For example: 貢布里希的<魔法、神話與隱喻:論諷刺畫>, 以薩.辛格的<卡夫卡的朋友>, “Migrations of Chineseness: Ethnicity in the Postmodern World,” “Interview with Toni Morrison.”
c.Any names or titles of people, books, or translated works quoting in the manuscripts for the first time should be noted with the original language in parenthesis. For examples: 拉岡<Jacques Lacan>, 《人性污點》(Human Stain), <支持阿爾及利亞> (“Taking a Stand for Algeria”). However, commonly known foreign names (like “Shakespeare”) or nouns (like “postmodernism”) require no notes.
d.Numbers and year should be written in Chinese characters; page numbers and published year of the cited works should be written in Arabic numerals. For example: 「經濟學家在十八世紀末首次被視為自成一類。到了一七九○年,偉大的英國哲學家兼政治家勃爾克(Edmund Burke)就已預見了歐洲的未來,並為之哀嘆不已,他說道:『騎士時代一去不復回,如今詭辯家、經濟學家與謀略家當道;歐洲的榮光永滅了。』」(1985:3).
e.Information of the bibliography should be quoted with the parenthesis in the manuscripts. For example, “(Ondaatje 75)” or “(Dissemination 236).” If different books or essays of an author are quoted more than once, note their title or year of publication. For example, “(Said 1978:7).” If different works of an author in the same year are quoted, note “a,” “b,” and “c” after the year of publication. For example, “(Derrida 1996a:68).”
f.Footnotes are only for supplementary exposition. Please list the bibliography after the main text. For the form of bibliography, please refer to the latest edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.

     
Mailing Address
     

Department of English, Tamkang University
151 Ying-chuan Road
Tamsui, Taipei County
Taiwan 25137, R.O.C.
Phone: 886-2-26215656 ext. 2006 Fax: 886-2-26209912
E-mail: ealataiwan@gmail.com

REAL: Review of English and American Literature [Yingmei wenxue pinglun]

Review of English and American Literature (REAL) is a journal of the English and American Literature Association of the Republic of China founded in 1993. REAL is published by Bookman Books Ltd. biannually (June and December) and is devoted to publishing innovative research results concerning English and American literature written in Mandarin Chinese. REAL was rated as the first-class journal by the National Science Council of Taiwan in 2003. Contributions from domestic and foreign researchers of English and American literatures are welcomed.

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

December 2016, Volume 29

Appropriating Shakespeare as an Act of Citation


This paper studies the representation of space in Shakespeare's Hamlet. By analyzing scenes related to men's control of space, and by discussing the meaning of their watch and spying as a point of departure, it brings into focal attention the significance of women's space, especially Gertrude and Ophelia's closets, and the wilderness where Ophelia drowns in a brook. The paper also reconsiders the representation of space in the play within Renaissance theatrical and political cultural contexts. These include two aspects: all-male cast on the stage scrutinized by an audience which consisted of both male and female, and the profusion of gendered space concepts prescribing spaces outside of home to men and within to women contradicted by the political reality of a female, Queen Elizabeth, on the English throne--a space that had traditionally been allotted to men, with duties that were generally conceptualized as exclusively men's. The paper explores the ironic effect of the gendered space Shakespeare put on stage to Renaissance audience who were inured to traditional gendered space concepts.

Hamlet, Gender Space, and Theatrical Space


This paper studies the representation of space in Shakespeare's Hamlet. By analyzing scenes related to men's control of space, and by discussing the meaning of their watch and spying as a point of departure, it brings into focal attention the significance of women's space, especially Gertrude and Ophelia's closets, and the wilderness where Ophelia drowns in a brook. The paper also reconsiders the representation of space in the play within Renaissance theatrical and political cultural contexts. These include two aspects: all-male cast on the stage scrutinized by an audience which consisted of both male and female, and the profusion of gendered space concepts prescribing spaces outside of home to men and within to women contradicted by the political reality of a female, Queen Elizabeth, on the English throne--a space that had traditionally been allotted to men, with duties that were generally conceptualized as exclusively men's. The paper explores the ironic effect of the gendered space Shakespeare put on stage to Renaissance audience who were inured to traditional gendered space concepts.

Searching for Justice Breaking with the Tribal, Capitalist, and State Mode of Economic Exchange in The Merchant of Venice


This paper attempts to examine the interactions among different characters through four different modes of economic exchange in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Ordered according to a teleological view of historical progress, the first refers to equal reciprocation in gift-giving. The second refers to capitalist modes of exchange. The third is the exchange of obedience for protection from the state. The final one is marked by personal sacrifice which has its foundations in a personal relationship with God, and a commitment to justice. I will first discuss how people who lived in tribal societies under processes of reciprocal exchange strengthen the bonds they shared with each other. Then, I will analyze the modes of commodity exchange representative of capitalism. The social-contract mode of exchange is dealt with when Shylock seeks the state's protection through its institutions. I will show that this drama presents these first three exchange as burdensome for both givers and receivers. Based on Jacques Derrida's discussion, I stress that Portia's last judgment does not really present the pursuit of true justice through exchange as a means to break with other modes of economic exchange. Instead, her judgment based on Christian merchants and her self-interest in Venice results in violent intolerance towards the non-Christian Shylock. I attempt to offer readers a reflective strategy for thinking again about the necessity and inevitability of the pernicious effects of economic exchange, such as land expropriation, land readjustment, or economic deregulation and development.

The Railway Images in the Victorian Period: A Study of "The Signal-Man" and Two Contemporary Paintings


Since the inauguration of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) in 1830, Victorian life and society had encountered an unprecedented transformation and challenge. On the one hand, the railway was a positive symbol of mechanical progress and technological advancement, introducing a hyper-efficient way of communication and transportation unimaginable in the previous decades. On the other hand, railway threatened the cherished ways of life and deep-rooted traditions, especially in the rural areas. It not only sharpened a sense of alienation and dislocation but also accelerated the derailment (physically and mentally) of family and social life, making it more difficult to assert one's identity in a changing world. This article used Charles Dickens's "The Signal-Man" and two contemporary paintings--Turner's Rain, Steam and Speed and Egg's The Travelling Companions--to explore the railway images and people's ambivalent attitudes in the Victorian period. In most of Dickens's works, especially in his short story "The Signal-Man," railway and its often hellish images served mainly as a negative catalyst for rural disintegration and human alienation. Though Dickens and many of his contemporaries recognized the ill effects of the railway, they had to acknowledge its benefits at the same time. Such ambivalence towards railway constituted a unique feature of the Victorian culture.

Why Study Literature? Where Do Literature Courses Lead Us to?


The Education and Discipline of Anglo-American Literature in National Sun Yat-sen University


Facing the Crisis of Higher Education: Examining the Transformer 4 of the English Language and Literature Related Departments in Taiwan from the Perspective of the Rising Asia


The Mourning Variations: Review of Madeleine Thien's Do Not Say We Have Nothing


Index: REAL 25-29 (2014-2016)


Other Issues

June 2016ALTTEXT, Volume 28
December 2015ALTTEXT, REAL Volume 27
June 2015ALTTEXT, Volume 26
December 2010, Issue 17
Senses and Literature, Volume 16
Homing and Housing, Volume 23
Special Topic: The Fantastic, Volume 24
Translation and Literatures in English, Volume 25
Jun 2013, Volume 22
Beyond the Canon, Volume 21
Trauma and Literature, Volume 20
Time Matters, Volume 19
Everydayness, Volume 18
Everydayness, Volume 18
Review of English and American Literature [Yingmei Wenxue Pinglun] vol. 15 December 2009, Volume 15
Word, Image, Space, Vol 14
Landscape and Literature, Vol 13
Local color of modern landscape, Volume 12
Review of English and American Literature [Yingmei Wenxue Pinglun] vol. 11, Volume 11
The City in English and American Literature, Volume 10
Global English Literature, Volume 9
Innocence and manifest destiny, Volume 8
Modernism, Volume 7
, Volume 6
Renaissance: between innovation and tradition, Volume 5
Innocence and Manifest Destiny: The Core Issue of American Literature , Issue 8