Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Publisher   Winter
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Review Editor:
Christa Buschendorf

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Managing Editor:
Damien B. Schlarb

Assistant Editor:
Nele Sawallisch

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

For our full submission guidelines, please visit
https://dgfa.de/american-studies-a-quarterly-2/submitting/
Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Special-topics issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4

Strategies of Textual Subversion in Herman Melville’s Israel Potter


Herman Melville’s Israel Potter (1854) has long suffered from critical disregard, whose origin is probably to be found in F. O. Matthiessen’s American Renaissance (1941), where Matthiessen referred to Melville’s eighth novel as a failure which illustrated the writer’s psychological and artistic insecurity (491). On the contrary, I will argue that Israel Potter is not only a successful novel, but also an anticipation of some of the central themes and strategies of contemporary—let us say postmodern—fiction. One of the core aspects of my analysis will be the metafictional dimension of the novel, i.e. the various ways in which the text turns to itself as well as to other texts and therewith creates a discourse where ‘reality’ is supplanted by ‘textuality.’ Furthermore, I will show that Israel Potter indicates an unsuspected development from Moby Dick by stressing the subversive character of the epic and tragic hero’s—a hero figure still embodied by Captain Ahab—metamorphosis into a bizarre and grotesque character, an anti-hero. In part, Mikhail Bakhtin’s characterization of the novel as carnivalesque, subversive, and polyphonic discourse will provide the theoretical basis for my reading of Melville’s controversial text.

The American Traveler’s Love and Solitude: The Atlas, or William T. Vollmann’s Pragmatics of the Double


William T. Vollmann’s novels are devoted to the interrogation of ‘America,’ which ultimately questions the American ‘I’ in the present time. A constant insight running through Vollmann’s work is that this American self is not so much a free individual as a formation in power relationships. In short, Vollmann constitutes the self in the present as the doppelganger of ‘America.’ Reflecting this inquiry, his 1996 book The Atlas brings together the numerous fragments of an American world traveler’s experiences. The nameless traveler always finds himself in asymmetrical relations with the ‘other,’ typically monetary relations with women in the Third World. In the age of globalization, the American self emerges out of the whole atlas. Yet, The Atlas rejects any optimistic gestures of Americanism: numerous scenes of violence and lines of difference run through the map, defining the position of the traveler where, against all idealism, he discovers himself to be a wretched white man scattering his desire and cash across the globe. In the post-Cold War era of Americanism, Vollmann’s atlas converts any optimistic view of the self into its negative double, an intolerable man in the map of power relationships. The Vollmannian doppelganger reveals the unbearable weight of being American.

“A common ear / for our deep gossip”: Selfhood and Friendship in the Poetry of Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara


A dichotomous tension between selfhood and friendship underlies 1950s American poetry. On the one hand, poets wished to partake in a larger poetic community, hence they stressed their commonalities with each other. On the other hand, each poet desired to construct a separate and visible identity, achieved by emphasizing one’s non-conformity. An illustration of this sameness/difference-dynamism can be found in the poetic dialogue between Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara. The two poets bonded over a shared homosexual identity, while they differed on what ‘kind’ of homosexuality was to be preferred: Ginsberg advocated a rugged, virile hip-ness; O’Hara personified an effeminate, campy queer-ness. This distinction between hip and queer was laid down by Ginsberg in his early poem “In Society,” and later reiterated by him in a Gay Sunshine interview. In his mock-manifesto “Personism” and the poem “Adieu to Norman, Bon Jour to Joan and Jean-Paul,” O’Hara adopted the vocabulary, playing the part of the giddy queen in opposition to an uptight Ginsberg. The distinction received its fullest treatment in Ginsberg’s elegy for O’Hara, “City Midnight Junk Strains,” which presents a campy and chatty O’Hara, a socialite queen pur sang, who constitutes the oppositional other to Ginsberg’s hip self.

Reflections on European History and Memory in Exile


This article provides an examination of the transnational memories of eleven modern historians who became eminent masters in their fields in the US: Russian-born Michael Karpovich and Alexander Gerschenkron, Romanian-born Mircea Eliade and Eugen Weber, German-born Felix Gilbert, George Mosse, Peter Gay, Fritz Stern, Saul Friedländer, Hungarian-born John Lukacs, and US-born Lucy Dawidowicz. Their presence at American universities brought a welcome cosmopolitanism and international scholarship. All became influential teachers at their institutions and in some instances policy-makers as well. Their recollections illuminate personal rites of passage but also the challenge of carrying out creative work before, during, and after World War II, most notably concerned with National Socialism and the Holocaust, but also political as well as economic revolutions.

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018: Digital Scholarship in American Studies, Vol. 63, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018, Vol. 63, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Marx and the United States, Vol. 62, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Poetry and Law, Vol. 62, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Environmental Imaginaries on the Move: Nature and Mobility in American Literature and Culture, Vol. 61, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Turkish-American Literature, Vol. 61, No.2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature, Vol. 60, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015, Double Issue, Vol. 60, No. 2/3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Network Theory and American Studies, Vol. 60, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014: South Africa and the United States in Transnational American Studies, Vol. 59, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 3,
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Iconographies of the Calamitous in American Visual Culture, Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012: Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011: American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2