Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Publisher   Winter
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Review Editor:
Christa Buschendorf

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Managing Editor:
Damien B. Schlarb

Assistant Editor:
Nele Sawallisch

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

For our full submission guidelines, please visit
https://dgfa.de/american-studies-a-quarterly-2/submitting/
Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Special-topics issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2

“This Small Herculean Labor”: Literary Professionalism, Georgic Work, and Walden


Although the professionalization of authorship has emerged as an important topic in recent decades, literary historians largely continue to focus on the economic and institutional factors which are deemed to have brought it about. This article, in contrast, focuses on the ideological transformations which made possible the establishment of 'literature' as a discrete, specialized discipline. For much of the eighteenth century, the exercise of social authority was understood to be dependent on freedom from work, and this principle was reflected in the idealization of literature as the domain of the leisured gentleman. Thus, for the professional author to become a respected figure, the relationship between labor and literature had to be rewritten, making occupation central to identity and wisdom reliant upon industry. In order to unveil this complex process, I begin by discussing some of the key traits of modern professionalism and trace its contested development during the antebellum period. I then concentrate on Henry David Thoreau's struggle to write for a living, paying particular attention to the ways in which Walden (1854) participates in the nineteenth-century redefinition of labor. Finally, a turn to the American georgic, and the forms of labor which it privileges, allows me to draw all of these threads together into a new reading of how that redefinition was achieved.

“The Yellow Wall-Paper”: The Ambivalence of Changing Discourses


Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" has generated a plethora of different, often contradictory readings. The text's richness results not only from the fact that it has been approached from various perspectives. Rather, the article argues, the story's contradictions and ambiguities remain unresolved because Gilman wrote at a time when major issues raised by her story were at the center of changing discourses. The article focuses on three of these issues: the change in the use of wallpaper in interior decoration, the debate about the color yellow, and the controversy about the effects of intellectual activity on the health of women.

Die Etablierung verfassungsgerichtlicher Streitschlichtung: Marbury v. Madison als richterliche Selbstautorisierung und sanfte Revolution


Since the path-breaking Marbury v. Madison decision in 1803, the USA has been well-known as the 'home of judicial review' and has as such served as a role model for constitutional courts around the world. However, the precarious political circumstances in which Chief Justice John Marshall had to operate in this case and the long prehistory of Marbury is less known. In this article both will be explored. It will be shown that 'judicial review' originally stemmed from a concept in British common law that, ironically, was used by the American independence movement against British parliamentarian acts that were seen as illegitimate such as the infamous Stamp Act. Nevertheless, despite its widespread acceptance at the beginning of the nineteenth century, Chief Justice Marshall took a substantial personal risk in pursuing judicial review against the anti-federalist Jefferson administration. But the way he undertook this veritable quiet revolution proves Marshall's capacity to avoid a no-win and therefore disastrous confrontation between judicial branch and the new government. In the end, it is the reasoning in this over 200-year-old judgement that explains why the power of the Supreme Court to declare acts of the Congress void is still widely accepted to this day.

Myth, Symbol, and American Studies Methodology: The Post-National Persistence of the Humanities


Since at least the appearance of scholar Bruce Kuklick's seminal 1972 statement, "Myth and Symbol in American Studies," the conventional 'myths' and 'symbols' that were once synonymous with the discipline largely have lost their former status as a legitimate methodology. As is well known, Kuklick insists that symbolic/semiotic methodologies cannot substitute for material, quantifiable research of 'America' in all its complexity. His is an empiricist's plea against symbolic signification. Kuklick's critique quietly prevails today, in an age when comparative sociological and ethnographic approaches to the study of American society and culture enjoy a conspicuous, if not uncontested, ascendance, at least in the United States. Within the context of the globalization of American Studies and current post-national approaches in the field, this essay argues that the worldwide images that 'America' projects, and the icons by which it is widely identified, retain not only the legitimacy of methodology, but suggest as well their necessity as a cross-cultural epistemology. On the one hand, language barriers alone recommend symbolic, iconographic study as a practical means of knowledge production and apprehension in lieu of an alternative common critical idiom. On the other hand, a resurgent European interest in 'America' as symbol suggests a tacit defense among international members of a growing American Studies community of symbolic figuration itself as a means of cultural comprehension.

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018: Digital Scholarship in American Studies, Vol. 63, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018, Vol. 63, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Marx and the United States, Vol. 62, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Poetry and Law, Vol. 62, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Environmental Imaginaries on the Move: Nature and Mobility in American Literature and Culture, Vol. 61, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Turkish-American Literature, Vol. 61, No.2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature, Vol. 60, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015, Double Issue, Vol. 60, No. 2/3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Network Theory and American Studies, Vol. 60, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014: South Africa and the United States in Transnational American Studies, Vol. 59, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 3,
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Iconographies of the Calamitous in American Visual Culture, Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012: Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011: American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2