Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Publisher   Winter
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Review Editor:
Christa Buschendorf

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Managing Editor:
Damien B. Schlarb

Assistant Editor:
Nele Sawallisch

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

For our full submission guidelines, please visit
https://dgfa.de/american-studies-a-quarterly-2/submitting/
Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Special-topics issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1

The Governmentality of Slavery in Colonial Boston, 1690-1760


This article explores slavery in colonial Boston as a contradictory legal, cultural, and religious institution by introducing the concepts of 'pastoral power' and 'governmentality' as analytical instruments to the study of slavery. New England slavery was a culturally specific form of bondage that still rested upon pre-modern and religious notions of contract. An all-pervasive Puritan religious culture, and the spatial and social proximity of the slaves and their masters, gave New England slavery its unique character and produced a distinct way of slave management that is best described as 'Puritan governmentality of slavery.' In addition, it is suggested that the concept of governmentality addresses some of the criticisms leveled against Eugene Genovese's model of slavery as 'paternalism,' as it allows for the recognition of resistance as a defining feature of slavery.

Race, Gender, Justice: Storytelling in The Greenlanders


In The Greenlanders (1988), a novel that I read as a meditation on the nature of justice, Jane Smiley crafts indispensable links between survival, legality, and shared narrative. In her critically ignored masterwork, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist posits how increased seclusion leads to the loss of collective stories in Greenland, the only established European civilization to fall apart and disappear. At the height of her fictional case study of justice, Smiley's ill-fated characters disband their annual tribunal (evocatively titled the 'Thing'). In doing so, they forfeit their chances of survival. To put it simply, the law equals life in Greenland. Without the Thing and its inherent -- and essential -- ironies, ironies that tie the practice of justice to memory, debate, and liability, the colony cannot endure. For Smiley, irony is the preserve of justice. Since irony is one way of creating correctives to the law, justice integrates incongruity in order to serve and protect. Without a system of law to question, however, there can be no corrective, no means by which to redirect the unjust courses of legality.

A Mysterious Heart: "Passing" and the Narrative Enigma in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! and Light in August


This essay argues that William Faulkner's Light in August and Absalom, Absalom! use the device of the narrative enigma to effectively tell stories in which the cultural practice of 'passing for white' in the United States under the Jim Crow system is strongly suggested. The secret is the essential feature of the social practice of passing, which makes the construction of the plot around a narrative enigma especially suitable. By not resolving the narrative enigma, the novels not only preserve the secret of the supposed 'passers,' but construct a narrative that departs from the most important conventions of the so-called genre of the passing novel. The truly modernist narrative strategy of placing an unresolved mystery to drive the plot even allows Faulkner to go a step further: the narrative can portray the Southern white fear of passing with even more significance than the actual act of passing itself. It is precisely the fact that the main characters, Joe Christmas and Charles Bon, have uncertain blood origins that allows and even urges the white community of Jefferson to build a story set only upon conjecture along established racial patterns. Therefore, the effect of the narrative enigma is twofold: it retains the racialization of the story and preserves the secret of the passers, while ambiguously uncovering the false grounds upon which the fear of miscegenation constructs and maintains racial boundaries.

"Not White, Not Quite": Irish American Identities in the U.S. Census and in Ann Patchett's Novel Run


In most (post)colonial and intercultural systems, white skin has acquired the role of a normative model that has profoundly shaped hierarchies and identities. This paper will assess the role of white identity as the norm by analyzing the ambivalent position of the Irish in America as both white and non-white. Underpinned by findings from whiteness studies, this article will look at data from the U.S. Censuses of 2010, 2000, and 1990 with respect to the categories race, ethnicity, and ancestry. The analysis will then be related to Ann Patchett's novel Run (2007), in which an Irish American family that adopted two black boys is faced with internal conflicts. The thesis is that in contemporary America, Irishness has become an attractive identity that is white and, at the same time, ethnically specific, an ambivalence that makes it possible to be different and special and to deal with trauma and guilt while enjoying the safety and privilege of whiteness. Irishness and whiteness are therefore flexible categories or self-identifications that are detached from notions of genetics, biology, and heritage and are free to be appropriated by everyone.

Taking Fire from the Bucolic: The Pastoral Tradition in Seven American War Poems


This article examines the role that the pastoral mode plays in seven American war poems: Herman Melville's "The Scout toward Aldie," Wallace Stevens's "The Death of a Soldier," Robert Frost's "Range Finding," James Dickey's "Firebombing," Walt Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," Bruce Weigl's "The Song of Napalm" and Brain Turner's "Eulogy." The essay observes that, contrary to the way in which it is often presented in the European tradition, the pastoral in the American tradition is not invoked as a means of taking cover from the horrors of war, but is instead described as being in league with war. Thus, the pastoral often takes the form of the counter-pastoral and reflects the negotiation that Leo Marx observes occurring between American depictions of nature and depictions of industrial urban life.

Nature's Nation on the Screen: Discursive Functions of the Natural Landscape in Early American Films


Although several cultural historians have tried to grapple with the discursive relationship between nature and technology during the ascent of modernity in America at the turn of the nineteenth century, and the issue has even been addressed in terms of its impact on contemporaneous visual culture, this contradiction remains unanswered with respect to cinema, the artistic form par excellence of the period. In this paper I address the issue by examining the variety of functions that natural landscape and its celluloid incarnations served in early American cinema. By considering potent actuality and fiction films of the period between 1895-1910, as well as nineteenth-century aesthetic constructs like 'transcendence,' the sublime (both natural and technological), and nature's role in the representation of the nation, I focus on the landscape's iterations in political, cultural, and narrative contexts, as well as the part it played in expressing anxieties and 'mastery' narratives attendant to the emergent modernity. This account bears out a concrete and apt explanation of the reasons why cinema occupies a privileged position in modern technological culture that has "inherited the alchemical dreams of the past" (Bryant 105). It is in this 'alchemy' that I propose the transposition of the natural into the visually reproducible takes place.

Forum: The 1946 Holocaust Interviews: David Boder's Intermedia Project in the Digital Age


Review of Alan Rosen, The Wonder of Their Voices: The 1946 Holocaust Interviews of David Boder (2010), and David. P. Boder, Die Toten habe ich nicht befragt. Ed. Julia Faisst, Alan Rosen, and Werner Sollors (2011).

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018: Digital Scholarship in American Studies, Vol. 63, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018, Vol. 63, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Marx and the United States, Vol. 62, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Poetry and Law, Vol. 62, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Environmental Imaginaries on the Move: Nature and Mobility in American Literature and Culture, Vol. 61, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Turkish-American Literature, Vol. 61, No.2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature, Vol. 60, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015, Double Issue, Vol. 60, No. 2/3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Network Theory and American Studies, Vol. 60, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014: South Africa and the United States in Transnational American Studies, Vol. 59, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 3,
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Iconographies of the Calamitous in American Visual Culture, Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012: Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011: American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2