Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Publisher   Winter
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Review Editor:
Christa Buschendorf

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Managing Editor:
Damien B. Schlarb

Assistant Editor:
Nele Sawallisch

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

For our full submission guidelines, please visit
https://dgfa.de/american-studies-a-quarterly-2/submitting/
Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Special-topics issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 1

The Spatial Politics of Urban Modernity: Henry James's Washington Square


The American Scene and other later texts have been at the center of attention in the critical discussion of Henry James's explorations of urban modernity. Against the background of these readings and the theoretical assumptions of the so-called spatial turn and urban studies, this contribution looks at Washington Square (1881) as an early example for James's ambivalent investigations of American urbanity and modernity. Understanding space not as a background for the plot but as constitutive for the agenda of the novel, I will focus on presentations of New York's gendered and racialized spatiality in Washington Square. While less complex and developed than the later texts usually discussed in this context, Washington Square presents New York as an increasingly diverse and dynamic environment, intertwined with both the nation and transnational processes, and thus a place of conflict over early urban modernity from the 1820s to the time of its publication in 1881.

The Presence of Hart Crane in Samuel R. Delany's Atlantis: Model 1924


Approximately thirty-five years after he first read Hart Crane's work, African American science fiction writer Samuel R. Delany wrote a story in which he described a fictitious encounter between his father and the poet, entitled Atlantis: Model 1924. The following article offers a detailed study of Crane's presence in Delany's novella. I argue that Delany seeks to mimic Crane's intention to present "a synthesis of America" in his collection of poems titled The Bridge (1930), a sequence that attempted to bridge between a wide variety of cultures and historical periods (qtd. in Edelman 179). Delany adds to his predecessor's audacious venture: he supplements it with fragments of African American history and develops a chain of literary connections revolving around Hart Crane. The first part of my paper explores the bridges between African American and white American culture that are established in the narrative. In the second and final part, I explore how Delany incorporates his predecessor's source material and poems, as well as other tributes to Crane, into his novella. As its title indicates, Atlantis: Model 1924 evinces its creator's views on questions of (poetic) origins and originality.

Richard Powers's The Echo Maker: Reassessing the Neuronovel in American Literature


According to Marco Roth, one of the most recent subgenres of the novel, the neuronovel, unquestioningly embraces the empirical neurological worldview. One of the best known novels he lists in this category is certainly Richard Powers's The Echo Maker (2003). Such an interpretation of the novel though is reductionist and a crude oversimplification of its epistemological framework: on a symbolical level, The Echo Maker rather discusses the supposed dichotomy between Freudian psychology and the more empirically and anatomically oriented approaches that are predominant in contemporary neurology. This theoretical debate is centred on two neurologists' competing approaches to the treatment of Capgras, the delusional syndrome the protagonist of the novel, Mark, suffers from. As it is, one approach considers Capgras a neuro-anatomical phenomenon while the other treats it as a psychological disorder. In the assessment of the intellectual development of the two neurologists engaging in this debate lies the key to the assessment of the novel's epistemological stance.

War as a Form of "Apotheosis": The Militarization of the USA and Don DeLillo's End Zone


The present paper investigates Don DeLillo's 1972 End Zone, arguing that football is a metaphor for war and that DeLillo's analysis of football and its culture effectively constitutes a critique of the war mentality undergirding American society. In this novel DeLillo meditates on the historical process that historian Michael S. Sherry calls the "militarization" (xi) of the USA and that, since the 1930s, turned the country into a military and economic superpower allowing a war mentality to enter deep into the grain of American culture. The essay will read DeLillo's focus on language against Nicholas Abraham and Maria Torok's psychoanalytical theories on demetaphorization as the linguistic counterpart of melancholia and against Herbert Marcuse's notion of functional language as a linguistic behavior that facilitates the annihilation of critical thinking. Both functional language and demetaphorization allow militarization to enforce its own discourse. Suffering from melancholia, the novel's protagonists fall prey to incorporation, a process whereby they disavow death as the product of war and, with it, pain, suffering, and destruction. As a result, the novel offers a cautionary tale about the consequences arising from an excessive exaltation of war as a means through which a nation seeks to affirm its "apotheosis" (End Zone 162).

Authentication Authority and Narrative Self-Erasure in Fight Club


This case study on the film adaptation Fight Club will serve as a representative of how some successful Hollywood productions delicately balance classic Hollywood narrative with the more self- conscious art-cinema narration. In order to illustrate how typical Hollywood conventions can be broken, a close reading of the film will focus on the narratological issues of "authentication authority" as well as the postmodern device of "narrative self-erasure." By stressing the importance of the narrative self-erasure of a central character in the film and with it the removal of everything he stands for, this article furthermore attempts to undermine frequent criticism on Fight Club that accuses the film of promoting a misogynist culture.

Barack Obama’s Landscapes: The Unfolding Road as Metaphor of American Unity


This essay examines Barack Obama's rhetoric during the 2008 presidential campaign. I argue that the use of metaphoric roads and landscapes in his speeches helped Obama to create a diverse political coalition by depicting the citizenry traveling together on a shared American journey. Such language also enabled Obama to bring together a range of policy objectives as stations along this common path. Obama's campaign logo enhanced this political imagery by presenting a dynamic scene with the stripes of the American flag suggesting movement over a hillside set against the backdrop of a rising sun. The essay analyzes Obama's use of these verbal and visual tropes in the context of similar rhetoric employed throughout the history of American public discourse from John Winthrop to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018: Digital Scholarship in American Studies, Vol. 63, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018, Vol. 63, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Marx and the United States, Vol. 62, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Poetry and Law, Vol. 62, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Environmental Imaginaries on the Move: Nature and Mobility in American Literature and Culture, Vol. 61, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Turkish-American Literature, Vol. 61, No.2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature, Vol. 60, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015, Double Issue, Vol. 60, No. 2/3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Network Theory and American Studies, Vol. 60, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014: South Africa and the United States in Transnational American Studies, Vol. 59, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 3,
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Iconographies of the Calamitous in American Visual Culture, Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012: Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011: American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2