Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Publisher   Winter
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Review Editor:
Christa Buschendorf

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Managing Editor:
Damien B. Schlarb

Assistant Editor:
Nele Sawallisch

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

For our full submission guidelines, please visit
https://dgfa.de/american-studies-a-quarterly-2/submitting/
Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Special-topics issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 20 (Philosophicum II), room 02-229
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 20 296
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: amst@uni-mainz.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.3

(Bawl-)Fredonia: Renaming, Remapping, and Retelling the United States in the Early Republic


In the aftermath of the American Revolution, the New York scientist and politician Samuel Latham Mitchill proposed 'Fredonia' as a new national name for the United States. Despite his clever promotional strategy that involved Noah Webster, the eminent national geographer Jedidiah Morse, and Thomas Jefferson, Mitchill failed as a naming patron. Yet, "Fredonia" prevailed as a critical and satirical expression of a distinct national discourse. It surfaces in national debates on language, geography, and history and finds its most elaborate response in Jonas Clopper's utopian satire Fragments of the History of Bawlfredonia (1819). Even though Fredonia is but a minor, nominal event, it illustrates well the stakes and conflicts of nation building. It is exemplary in the way naming, mapping, and historicizing the United States are put to use as key strategies for projecting a communal basis of national identity. Tracing Fredonia from its national, idealistic conception to its polemical appropriation in political discourse and its imaginative transformation into "Bawlfredonia" sheds light on the ideological and political ruptures in the young republic. It also shows the political limits of the scientific empiricism that drove nation building in a spirit of Enlightenment. The literary recoding of Clopper's satire brings out, in particular, the political, representational, and aesthetic transformations that shaped the literature of the Early Republic. Fragments of the History of Bawlfredonia offers a satirical commentary on how historiography, geography, and linguistics served as metasettings in the search for an American character. Its humorous and reflexive encounter also becomes an investigation of the confines of literary imagination and its social functions.

“Evangelize-Americanize”: White Religion and Chicago’s Immigrants


Histories of European immigration to the late nineteenth century United States have emphasized vectors of acculturation such as language, socioeconomics, and ethnicization. And the emerging field of "whiteness studies" has convincingly pointed out the malleability of racial categories that were contingent on the legal and cultural power structures in which immigrants found themselves. However, the degree to which religion could define cultural whiteness beyond its traditional locus among WASPs and function as an agent of acculturation remains largely underexplored. This article traces the efforts of Anglo-American Protestants to recruit actively "desirable" immigrants from Northern Europe and the opennness of these immigrants to utilize religion as a fulfillment of racial promise. Taking the story of such immigrants among Chicago Anglo-Protestants as a case study, I argue that while factors of race and language could play a role, religion is the crucial link missing from current and ongoing efforts to outline the cultural whiteness that qualified good Americans.

American Rhetorics of Sovereignty and (Im)mobility in the Age of the Global Flow


10 June, 2006: On a shuttle bus to Daytona Beach from the airport in Orlando, I sit beside Rachel. We are on our way to spend a week reading Advanced Placement English Language exams for the Educational Testing Service. I am a graduate student and she is an AP English teacher from Santa Fe New Mexico. We have nearly two hours on the bus to talk. I feel drawn to her air of experience and political responsibility; she volunteers with search and rescue teams on the US/Mexican border and tells me that more and more bodies are appearing in the desert this year since fences have been raised to block less hazardous crossings. I tell her I had lived and worked in Turkey for seven years. "How did you like the life of the expat?" she said. Later in the conversation, I mentioned that I married before returning to the US with my Turkish partner to pursue my degree. "How does he feel about being an immigrant?" she said. Because I respected her, I finally had to ask: "Did you notice that you named me expatriate, but you called my partner immigrant?" Her response was explosive: "Oh My God. I did," she said. "I didn't even think about it." Turkey, America. Immigrant, expatriate.

Between Nostalgic Resistance and Critical Appropriation: Contemporary American Fiction on/of the Information Age and the Potentials of (Post)Humanist Narrative


This essay examines four contemporary American novels on the information age and its effects on (post)human identity and agency, transformations of knowledge, a changed media environment, and the role of America in transnational geopolitical complexities: Dan Chaon's Await Your Reply (2009), Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010), Gary Shteyngart's Super Sad True Love Story (2010), and Dave Eggers' The Circle (2013). The four novels mark a recent trend in contemporary fiction in displaying a "metamodern" ambivalence between resisting a data-driven consumer culture while at the same time incorporating new media aesthetics and thus expressing a pragmatic willingness to adapt to such a culture (Vermeulen and van den Akker). By doing so, the novels stage themselves as new media's complementary 'other' that both critically observes and fills the voids left by an informational media culture.

Digital American Studies: An Introduction and Rationale


"The critic is not the one who debunks, but the one who assembles." (Latour 246)

A Larger View of Digital American Studies


By abandoning our conception of the computer as merely a mechanical clerk suited mostly to repetitive routine operations, by learning to know its features, uses, limitations, and possibilities -- its nature, in short -- we shall be properly re-organizing our thinking for the new age. What the computer will enable us to do in our humanistic tasks has hardly been imagined yet. Even immoderate speculation tends to fall behind the new reality. Louis T. Milic, "The Next Step" (1966)

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018: Digital Scholarship in American Studies, Vol. 63, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2018, Vol. 63, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Marx and the United States, Vol. 62, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017: Poetry and Law, Vol. 62, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2017, Vol. 62, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Environmental Imaginaries on the Move: Nature and Mobility in American Literature and Culture, Vol. 61, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016: Turkish-American Literature, Vol. 61, No.2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2016, Vol. 61, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature, Vol. 60, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015, Double Issue, Vol. 60, No. 2/3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2015: Network Theory and American Studies, Vol. 60, No.1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014: South Africa and the United States in Transnational American Studies, Vol. 59, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 3,
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2014, Vol. 59, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Iconographies of the Calamitous in American Visual Culture, Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013: Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012: Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011: American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010: Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009: Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008: Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2